Testimonials

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I came to my first Dalcroze class knowing very little about it – or at least, having had it explained to me, but not really getting it.

Within minutes I was totally engaged, and fascinated. It seemed to address all my fundamental insecurities with music – my issues with memory, coordination and listening. It was a bit like finally getting a diagnosis for a chronic health problem that has always been there, but which is too embarrassing to mention. Not only a diagnosis, but a cure – a way forward.

Monica introduces each challenge joyfully and with great humour, and we all responded to that. Interestingly, my seventeen-year-old daughter found most of the exercises much easier than I did. Once I’d swallowed my pride, I began to acknowledge where my problems lay, and how they had arisen.

I firmly believe that if all children were to experience Dalcroze as a part of their education, it would benefit them hugely in all areas – communication, perception, coordination, confidence and self-expression.

And the great thing is – it seems it’s never too late!
Sally Beamish - composer
I studied and practised Dalcroze for two years at the Royal Northern College of Music and found it absolutely crucial to my development both as a music teacher and performer. The concept that resonated best with me was to experience and learn music through as many different senses and styles as possible and I found a huge correlation between Dalcroze and my own musical experiences as a folk musician. Scottish dancing is a great example. The intrinsic rhythms and styles of Scotland's music are best learnt, experienced and internalised through dancing as opposed to playing them on an instrument. Only when you feel the music will you be able to understand and play it.
Patsy Reid, Scottish Fiddle Player
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Monica is a dynamic and innovative practitioner as well as a skilled trainer and workshop leader. She has delivered a number of high quality, bespoke training sessions across our three Big Noise Centres and according to staff feedback, her sessions have been highly relevant, extremely well-prepared and greatly appreciated.
Francis Cummings, Director of Music, Sistema Scotland
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I came to my first Dalcroze class knowing very little about it – or at least, having had it explained to me, but not really getting it.

Within minutes I was totally engaged, and fascinated. It seemed to address all my fundamental insecurities with music – my issues with memory, coordination and listening. It was a bit like finally getting a diagnosis for a chronic health problem that has always been there, but which is too embarrassing to mention. Not only a diagnosis, but a cure – a way forward.

Monica introduces each challenge joyfully and with great humour, and we all responded to that. Interestingly, my seventeen-year-old daughter found most of the exercises much easier than I did. Once I’d swallowed my pride, I began to acknowledge where my problems lay, and how they had arisen.

I firmly believe that if all children were to experience Dalcroze as a part of their education, it would benefit them hugely in all areas – communication, perception, coordination, confidence and self-expression.

And the great thing is – it seems it’s never too late!
Sally Beamish - composer
I studied and practised Dalcroze for two years at the Royal Northern College of Music and found it absolutely crucial to my development both as a music teacher and performer. The concept that resonated best with me was to experience and learn music through as many different senses and styles as possible and I found a huge correlation between Dalcroze and my own musical experiences as a folk musician. Scottish dancing is a great example. The intrinsic rhythms and styles of Scotland's music are best learnt, experienced and internalised through dancing as opposed to playing them on an instrument. Only when you feel the music will you be able to understand and play it.
Patsy Reid, Scottish Fiddle Player
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